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JOHN MARKS TEMPLETON JR., M.D.

Born: February 19, 1940
Died: May 16, 2015

Jack Templeton died of cancer at home in Bryn Mawr, PA. He is survived by his wife, Josephine whom he married in 1970, his two daughters Heather Dill and Jennifer Simpson, a brother and six grandchildren.

Jack had two remarkable careers: first as a pediatric surgeon and director of the trauma program at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and, from 1995, managing the John Templeton Foundation, created by his father, as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries on the big questions of human purpose and ultimate reality. During Jack's 20 years at the helm of the foundation both as president and after his father's death in 2008 as chairman, its endowment grew from $28 million to $3.34 billion, with 188 grants awarded in 2014 alone, primarily to universities and scholars worldwide. The annual Templeton Prize award, to "a living person who has made an exceptional contribution to affirming life's spiritual dimension." The prize, of over a million dollars, makes it one of the world's largest given to an individual. A publishing division which Jack added in 1997 has published 216 books to date.

After graduating from the George School in Pennsylvania, Jack was a Yale Scholar of the House concentrating in history. He was active in Dwight Hall as vice president his senior year, as well as in the Political Union, Challenge, and the Society for African Affairs. He was a member of Elihu. He roomed with Raymond (Bud) Baker. After Harvard Medical School and residency at the Medical College of Virginia he trained in Pediatric Surgery with Dr. C. Everett Koop at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and participated in the separation of many conjoined twins. He met his wife, the former Josephine Garguilo, when she served as lead anesthesiologist.

He was a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, served as vice chairman of the American Trauma Society and was a president of its Pennsylvania division. He served on various boards, including the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, Foreign Policy Research Institute, American Trauma Society, National Bible Association and Templeton Growth Fund Ltd.

Along with numerous medical articles, his first book was Thrift and Generosity, the Joy of Giving (2004) followed by his autobiography: John M. Templeton Jr.: Physician, Philanthropist, Seeker (2008). The Wall Street Journal stated that "His philanthropy went far beyond charity to explore mankind's moral purpose. The motto of the Templeton Foundation is "how little we know, how eager we are to learn."

Chris Cory remembers: "I grew up two blocks away from Jack in Englewood, NJ and knew him well enough so that when he came back from his 1960 summer in Cameroon, he taught me the game he brought back where you drop stones into a succession of hollows on a board, now sold as Mancala. He encouraged a group that brought two big speakers on public affairs to Yale in our time, once hosting a weekend for the students involved at his family's summer home on Fisher's Island. Always modest, he liked being called by the self-deprecating nickname 'Wedge' because, he said in the slang of the time, that's the 'simplest tool.'"




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